Backup JMR20160418: Economics 101, a Novel, ch_27 -- Keeping Important Things Important

(The story starts here: http://free-is-not-free.blogspot.jp/2016/03/economics-101-novel-ch00.html.
The previous chapter is here: http://free-is-not-free.blogspot.com/2016/04/economics-101-novel-ch26-finding-trees.html)

[This is a backup. I posted it in a hurry this morning, and it was just too incomplete. Read the improved version at http://free-is-not-free.blogspot.jp/2016/04/economics-101-novel-ch27-keeping.html.]


Are you wondering why Bobbie and Karel seem to be so much into emotional S&M?

But they aren't. Sure, there is some pain here. But it isn't sadism and it isn't masochism.

There's something about faith that pushes us to do things that are hard, whether it's religious faith or faith in friends and family or faith in your job and your company or faith in scientific principles or faith in yourself, or whatever.

It's only when you use that faith against someone that it turns into sadism, and it's only when you use that faith against yourself that it turns into masochism.

What Karel and Bobbie are doing is negotiating some important things, getting to know each other, and developing certain kinds of inner strength that are necessary for married people.

For mortals, marriage is always a collection of ambiguities. That's a big part of why it's important to obtain social recognition for it in the form of a marriage license or the equivalent. And to obtain the blessings of God and Nature, in the form of religious or other solemn ceremony.

And why it's important to do both of those before you begin the practical part of marriage.



Bobbie finally said, "Sometimes I think you're superhuman."

"You, too. That is, I think you're superhuman, too."

"I WANT you to be superhuman!"

"Trying to be superhuman is not good."

"Four months and two weeks in the islands, that we've been testing each other. We should have ignored Professor MacVittie and our parents and talked seriously about it when we first realized we liked each other so much."

"When was that?"

"I think I might've first understood it when the travel agents thought we were planning our honeymoon."

"Yeah. I definitely recognized that our oppositeness had something good in it by then. Maybe before."

"We could have gotten married before we came."

"But we didn't.

"I'm sorry. I shouldn't have admitted I want the impossible."

Karel asked, "Impossible? Marrying each other here?"

"No bishop or stake president, no temple. No justice of the peace, no county offices to get a marriage license."

Another uncomfortable pause, and then Karel said, "Even if we decided to call ourselves the law on this island and make our own marriage license and marriage certificate, which I think we could successfully argue should be honored, we still have one problem." And he looked earnestly at Bobbie. "This island is no place to have a baby."

"Why not?"

"Uhm."

"I'm a licensed nurse in my home state. I earned my money for grad school as a nurse in the obstetrics wing of a hospital, and as a midwife's assistant. You know that."

"But I'm the one who would have to be the nurse and midwife."

"I'll teach you."

"What if there are complications?"

"God put us here alone, He can jolly well make sure there won't be anything we can't deal with."

"Jolly well?"

"Something my mom sometimes says."

Karel sighed.

"You sighed."

"Let's be superhuman a few more weeks."

"Why? Making a marriage license won't take that much time."

"But if you're going to be pregnant, it would be better to already have a hut for you to be pregnant in when you need a hut to be pregnant in. And maybe we'll be rescued before we finish the hut."

"I'm not sure I want to be rescued. Maybe we'll forget how we feel now."

"I'm not sure I want to be rescued, either. But if we are, let's come back here to live for a while. We can call it an advanced applied research project."

"Hah!"

And they both laughed.

"Actually, we could," Bobbie said.

"Too much, too much. We need to step back and think and pray."

So they prayed together and then separated and prayed apart and then got back together.

"Let's get started on the hut."

So they spent the next two weeks planning and building the hut, and writing the marriage license.

And being superhuman for each other.


(The link to the next chapter will be here when it's ready.)

(The chapter index is here: http://joel-rees-economics.blogspot.jp/2016/04/economics-101-novel-index.html)

[This is a second backup, from 2016-04-19. This chapter is taking a long time to put together right. Lots of things to consider, and we don't want Karel and Bobbie just using legal conceits to seduce each other.]

(The story starts here: http://free-is-not-free.blogspot.jp/2016/03/economics-101-novel-ch00.html.
The previous chapter is here: http://free-is-not-free.blogspot.com/2016/04/economics-101-novel-ch26-finding-trees.html)

[JMR20160418: I had to re-work this quite a bit. You can read the backup here: http://free-is-not-free.blogspot.com/2016/04/backup-jmr20160418-economics-101-novel.html.]

So, are you wondering why Bobbie and Karel seem to be so much into emotional S&M?

But they aren't, really. Sure, there is some pain here. But it isn't sadism and it isn't masochism.

There's something about faith that can push us to do things that are hard, whether it's religious faith or faith in friends and family or faith in your job and your company or faith in scientific principles or faith in yourself, or faith in whatever.

It's only when you use that faith against yourself that it turns into masochism, and it's only when you use that faith against someone else that it turns into sadism.

What Karel and Bobbie are doing is negotiating some important things, getting to know each other, and developing certain kinds of inner strength that are necessary for married people.

For mortals, marriage is always a collection of ambiguities. That's a big part of why it's important to obtain social recognition for it in the form of a marriage license or the equivalent. And to obtain the blessings of God and Nature, in the form of religious or other solemn ceremony.

And a big part of why it's important to do both of those things before you begin the practical part of marriage.



Bobbie finally broke the silence and said, "Sometimes I think you're superhuman."

"You, too. Uhm, you're superhuman, too."

"I WANT you to be superhuman!"

"Trying to be superhuman is not good."

"Four months and two weeks it's been in these islands, that we've been testing each other like this. We could have just ignored Professor MacVittie and our parents, and talked seriously about our feelings when we first realized we liked each other so much."

"When was that?"

"I think I first understood I had feelings for you when the travel agents thought we were planning our honeymoon. And I called it silly because I didn't want to admit my feelings"

"Yeah. I definitely recognized that our oppositeness had something good in it by then. And I didn't admit it, either."

"If we'd been more honest about our feelings, we could have gotten married before we came."

"But we didn't."

"Oh, dear. We're talking about marriage again. I'm sorry. Maybe I shouldn't have admitted I want the impossible."

And Karel asked, "Impossible? Marrying each other here is impossible?"

"No bishop or stake president. No justice of the peace, no county offices to get a marriage license. No temple."

Another uncomfortable pause, and then Karel said, "You and I are the justice of the peace and the county officers here. There's no one else to turn to. We are the only law on this island. If we want a marriage license, we'll have to make it ourselves."

Bobbie and Karel thought about this for a bit.

Then he continued. "But we still have one problem." And he looked earnestly at Bobbie. "This island is no place to have a baby."

"Why not?"

"Uhm, ..."

"I'm a licensed nurse in my home state. I earned money for grad school as a nurse in the obstetrics wing of a hospital, and as a midwife's assistant. You know that."

"But I'm the one who would have to be the nurse and midwife."

"I'll teach you."

"What if there are complications?"

"God put us here alone, He can jolly well make sure there won't be anything we can't deal with."

"Jolly well?"

"Something my mom sometimes says."

Karel sighed.

"You sighed."

"I think we should be superhuman for a few more weeks."

"Why? Making a marriage license won't take that much time."

"But if I we, uhm, that is, if I get you, oh, ..."

"If I get pregnant."

"If you're going to be pregnant, it would be better to already have a hut for you to be pregnant in when you need a hut to be pregnant in."

"I guess I can see needing some protection from the elements that the tent can't give us."

"And maybe, just maybe, we'll be rescued before we finish the hut."

Another. Whether they embraced each other or not, I'll leave to your imagination.

"I'm not sure I want to be rescued." Bobbie's voice was muffled against Karel's shoulder. "Maybe we'll forget how we feel now."

"I'm not sure I want to be rescued, either. But if we are, let's come back here to live for a while. We can call it an advanced applied research project."

"Hah!"

And they both laughed.

"Actually, we could," Bobbie said.

"Too much, too much. We need to step back and think and pray."

So they prayed together and then they prayed separately. And then they sat together again and prayed some more. And what they said in their prayers is their business, not ours.

"Let's get started on the hut."

"I guess this is okay?" asked Wycliffe.

Hanaka replied, "What else can be done?"

So they spent the next two weeks planning and building the hut, and writing laws so they could write the marriage license.

And being superhuman for each other.


(The link to the next chapter will be here when it's ready.)

(The chapter index is here: http://joel-rees-economics.blogspot.jp/2016/04/economics-101-novel-index.html)



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